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caraway image

Caraway is Pacific Seacraft Flicka number 423.  She was built in 1992 and shipped new by her first owner to Falmouth, England in 1993.

She cruised around the South coast of England for many years before reaching Burnham on Crouch on the Essex coast where I found her.

caraway image

Caraway was dirty and damp when I went to see her in Burnham on Crouch. Her batteries were flat and the 'broker' who was supposed to be selling her was happy to leave her in this condition and with flat batteries.  It was no shock that nobody had bought her.  There was no hope of a test sail and the conditions were miserable. Nonetheless I knew immediately she was the boat for me.

Few small boats are made to such a high standard. Few small boats have proper bronze sea cocks, teak cabinetry and a real cruising rig.  The Pacific Seacraft Flicka stands out as an example of what can be achieved in small cruising boat design.  There aren't many 20 footers that I can stand up in.  Caraway looks small and is small but when you take her to sea she feels like a bigger boat.

Caraway interior looking forward

Note the teak-faced plywood cabin sides, the solid teak cabinetry, handrails and the solid oak compression post.  The cabin sole is teak and holly ply with a two-pack varnish finish.

The white gelcoat areas are the inner module which is a single piece that is inserted into and bonded to the hull to provide the interior structure.  The inner module brings strength and stiffness to the hull. It also provides the engine bay and at the bow provides a gap between the hull and cabin to keep condensation away from the berth area.

caraway interior showing spice rack and cutlery drawer

Above the compression post is a laminated wooden arch support for the mast which is immensely strong and carries compression forces to the cabin sides and partial bulwarks. The oak compression post is not really necessary but was added as an optional extra for peace of mind.

A cushion with a wooded base inserts into the slot in the v-berth to make a spacious and comfy bed. Plenty of space for two adults.

Caraway interior looking aft with the heads to the left, nb. the companionway box instead of the standard steps and locker above

The bronze portlights are a custom design that's now discontinued I'm sad to say.  Pacific Seacraft now use horrid biscuit tins ports in stainless with plastic handles from Bomar. Sadly, since the last of the Flickas were built Pacific Seacraft has been in decline. The bronze is gone and the standards have fallen.  Things may improve with the new management but I'm not confident.

Caraway looking forward, nb. the teak and holly cabin sole

caraway image

Caraway is Pacific Seacraft Flicka number 423.  She was built in 1992 and shipped new by her first owner to Falmouth, England in 1993.

She cruised around the South coast of England for many years before reaching Burnham on Crouch on the Essex coast where I found her.

caraway image

Caraway was dirty and damp when I went to see her in Burnham on Crouch. Her batteries were flat and the 'broker' who was supposed to be selling her was happy to leave her in this condition and with flat batteries.  It was no shock that nobody had bought her.  There was no hope of a test sail and the conditions were miserable. Nonetheless I knew immediately she was the boat for me.

Few small boats are made to such a high standard. Few small boats have proper bronze sea cocks, teak cabinetry and a real cruising rig.  The Pacific Seacraft Flicka stands out as an example of what can be achieved in small cruising boat design.  There aren't many 20 footers that I can stand up in.  Caraway looks small and is small but when you take her to sea she feels like a bigger boat.

Caraway interior looking forward

Note the teak-faced plywood cabin sides, the solid teak cabinetry, handrails and the solid oak compression post.  The cabin sole is teak and holly ply with a two-pack varnish finish.

The white gelcoat areas are the inner module which is a single piece that is inserted into and bonded to the hull to provide the interior structure.  The inner module brings strength and stiffness to the hull. It also provides the engine bay and at the bow provides a gap between the hull and cabin to keep condensation away from the berth area.

caraway interior showing spice rack and cutlery drawer

Above the compression post is a laminated wooden arch support for the mast which is immensely strong and carries compression forces to the cabin sides and partial bulwarks. The oak compression post is not really necessary but was added as an optional extra for peace of mind.

A cushion with a wooded base inserts into the slot in the v-berth to make a spacious and comfy bed. Plenty of space for two adults.

Caraway interior looking aft with the heads to the left, nb. the companionway box instead of the standard steps and locker above

The bronze portlights are a custom design that's now discontinued I'm sad to say.  Pacific Seacraft now use horrid biscuit tins ports in stainless with plastic handles from Bomar. Sadly, since the last of the Flickas were built Pacific Seacraft has been in decline. The bronze is gone and the standards have fallen.  Things may improve with the new management but I'm not confident.

Caraway looking forward, nb. the teak and holly cabin sole


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